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American Civil Rights Project

The American Civil Rights Project knows that Americans’ civil rights are individual rights, equally held by all (regardless of whether those rights are understood as a positive enactment of centuries of ratifiers or as the common endowment of all children from nature and nature’s God). The ACR Project exists to protect and, where necessary, restore the primacy of all Americans’ shared civil rights. And we need your help!

Our Mission

Learn more about our mission and goals.

Our People

Meet our dedicated officers and directors.

Donate to Support Our Mission

The American Civil Rights Project, a public-interest law firm, seeks to assure that American law equally protects all Americans. The ACR Project needs your help to pay for its efforts seeking to accomplish that goal. The ACR Project is a tax-exempt public charity, under Section 501(c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code, so all contributions to the ACR Project may be tax deductible under Section 170 of the Code.

Our Latest News

August 6, 1965: President Lyndon B. Johnson Signs the Voting Rights Act of 1965

July 7th, 2020|Blog|

Things happen slow and then fast. It took almost a century for Congress, and President Lyndon B. Johnson, a Democrat from Texas, to enact the Civil Rights Act of 1964, putting America back on the side of defending the equality before the law of all U.S. Citizens. Then, it took less than a year (less than a week after an intervening atrocity) for President Johnson to call Congress to the special session that would produce the Voting Rights Act of 1965. This piece originally ran as part of a Constituting America program on American history. This piece originally

July 2, 1964: President Lyndon B. Johnson Signs the Civil Rights Act of 1964

July 6th, 2020|Blog|

For a decade after the Civil War, the federal government sought to make good its promises and protect the rights of the liberated as American citizens.  Most critically, in the Civil Rights Act of 1866, Congress created U.S. Citizenship and, in the Civil Rights Act of 1875, Congress guaranteed all American Citizens access to all public accommodations. Then, stretching from 1877 to the end of the century following the close of the Civil War, the federal government did nothing to assure that those rights were respected. Eventually, in Brown v. Board of Education, the Supreme Court started to admit that this was a problem, a clear failure to abide by our Constitution. But the Supreme Court (in Brown II) also made clear that it wouldn’t do anything about it. So things stood, until a bad man in high office made it his business to get the federal government again on the side of right, equality, and law. That man was Lyndon Baines Johnson. And while this story could be told in fascinating, exhaustive detail, these are its broad outlines. This piece originally ran as part of a Constituting America program on American history.

May 17, 1954: Brown v. Board of Education, the Courts, Society, and Jim Crow

June 22nd, 2020|Blog|

You can count on one hand the number of Supreme Court decisions that normal people can identify by name and subject. Brown is one of them (and, arguably, both the widest and most accurately known). And it’s place in the public mind is well-deserved, even if it should be adjusted to reflect more accurately its place in modern American history. This piece originally ran as part of a Constituting America program on American history.

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